Project Atlas

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Division Details
(thumbnail)
Multidisciplinary
Ticker MD
Leads Faulx
Archivists N/A
Status Mostly Finished
Channel AJ: MD
Staff
Research Faulx
Contributors Project Snapshot, Project Compass, Elisa Fir, Brawyn78
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Drafted by Faulx.

Contents

Summary

Project Atlas has long been left to lie fallow in the Arek'Jaalan community. Its stated goal is to, "Create a navigable space-time map of Anoikis." Thanks to data from several other AJ projects completed in April YC 114, this goal is significantly closer. Originally, much of the work of finding wormhole interconnections was done as part of Project Compass, however, it was decided to break up the work and publish that information here under Project Atlas. Some effort has also been undertaken to determine the meaning behind the loci of each w-space system.

Methodology

The originally proposed methods of the project were to gather information from multiple participants as they travelled through w-space. However, this proved unnecessary as capsuleer Brawyn78 had made a significant record of the systems using information which was freely available through the NeoCom. Since then, Brawyn78's research has become inaccessible, though not before the data was used to create a full listing of w-space systems on GalNet. Further, capsuleer crowd-sourcing resources were used to find patterns in how these systems were connected to each other.

Data sources

During the course of Project Compass, much data were gathered as to the nature of the wormholes local to each system. This data source was combined with other sources such as Brawyn78's listing of w-space systems (datacore), constellations, and regions (which was gathered and published before that information was locked out of the NeoCom). Publication of capsuleer crowd-sourcing was also relied on as a source for determining patterns of static wormholes, this data was cross checked against detailed logs of wormhole traversals and system scans from Project Compass. Another source of information was Elisa Fir, who shared information gathered about base scan signal strength and observed locations for many types of wormholes. A number of included wormhole configurations have also been theorized by scientists but, to the best of all combined knowledge, have not been observed. These wormholes have also been included in the data along with their theoretical mass limits and lifetimes. Some of the data comes also from the Project Snapshot event in March YC 114, which estimated numbers for many types of wormholes found exclusively in high security space and demonstrated some of the mechanics behind wormhole formation. Further, accounts of the as yet undocumented occurrences of "constellation" static wormholes is also included in the report.

Results

Locations

First, we begin with locations. Project Compass was able to determine a direction to w-space (a.k.a. Anoikis).
Image generated for Project Compass
Image generated for Project Compass

Compass also pinpointed the locations of stars in Anoikis to within a few light years.
Image generated for Project Compass

Compass only managed to get 294 systems; however, Brawyn78's data was used to create a complete listing of all known w-space loci, a total of 2498 systems. Thus the Project Compass images account for roughly 11.8% of all systems in Anoikis.

Interconnections

Static Wormholes

The list of all w-space systems also includes information about static wormholes in each system.

A system's "static" wormhole is a special type of wormhole which is "native" to each system in w-space. This wormhole once collapsed will instantaneously reopen in the same system. Its exit point changes with each collapse but is limited to either a specific class of w-space (1-6), high sec, low sec, or null sec. Each class of w-space has a limited set of static type wormholes which may be found there. Each "type" of wormhole (e.g. N110, B274, or D845) will exit exclusively in certain areas of space (see wormhole charts). There are some uncommon exceptions to the pattern of static wormholes reopening in the same system (see "constellation" static).

There also exist numerous types of non-static wormhole, which are variously called "periodic" or "regional" wormholes. Both of these terms are misnomers, since these wormholes seem neither to have a specific period for reoccurrence nor to be restricted to a certain region. Therefore, at the risk of breaking with tradition, the project will refer to these as "wandering" wormholes. (see Wandering Wormholes)

Information about where static wormholes appear is extrapolated from patterns apparent in data from capsuleer crowd-sourcing, as well as Project Compass logs, and to some limited extent agrees with much of Brawyn78's data (likely gathered from earlier instances of the same crowd-sourcing).

In most regions of Anoikis a single type of static wormhole can be found; however, there are regions where several types of static wormhole can appear. "Region" and "Constellation" here refer to a numerical designation (Regions 1-30, Constellations 1-323) which originally appeared in the NeoCom and was used to catalogue loci. They should not be confused with the Region/Constellation names from k-space. In those regions where more than one type of static appear, every system in a constellation will contain the same static type (see Poster below). For example, in Region 1, constellations 311-313 have static types Z060 and all other constellations in that Region, i.e. constellations 314-323, have static type J244. The most varied region by static type is Region 30, which has 6 static types among its many constellations: one of each type leading to every class of w-space. In order to figure out what Region and Constellation a given system is in, simply reference the list of all w-space systems (also, it may once again be possible to use the NeoCom to view this information).

Project Compass crafted the static wormhole interconnection data into impressive looking graphics which show all possible static connections in w-space:
Image generated for Project Compass

Poster

The next image is a break down of static connections by region. It should be noted that the directions to high low and null sec are selected for clarity rather than accuracy. The above image is basically all of the regions below overlaid on top of each other (click to enlarge): Image generated for Project Compass

Wandering Wormholes

A wandering wormhole is a wormhole that wanders from system to system. Unlike static wormholes, after a wandering wormhole collapses it will open in a different system within the same "scope". The term "scope" must be used because, some types of wandering wormhole are able to wander between classes (or at least the same type appears in more than one class, for example wormhole D792 appears in both class 5 and class 6 systems) (see wormhole type charts). The exact numbers for wandering wormholes are largely unknown, since in order to directly count them, one must simultaneously scan every system in a given scope. This is exactly what Project Snapshot attempted to do, with some limited success, thus much of Snapshot's data was used to understand the nature of wandering wormholes, although in Snapshot, these are called "periodic" wormholes.

Constellation Wormholes

Although they have yet to be well documented, there are anecdotal reports of occasional "extra" static type wormholes which will appear from time to time in a system. Some early experiments posted on the capsuleer forums (third post down) demonstrated that, after collapsing, these wormholes will reopen in another system within the same constellation. Reports from Talocan United members living in Class 2 space (whose systems normally have only 2 static wormholes) tell that from time to a third "static" type wormhole will appear in system. This report also stated that the exact type of that wormhole did not always match the "native" statics, though typically it duplicated one of the native statics. Also, this 3rd static wormhole would always open at the same time that a native static was collapsed and reopened. Other residents of class 2 and 3 space have reported similarly, though they claimed that the extra static could open at any time, not just after the collapse of a native static. Another resident in Class 4, space has never seen any "extra" static wormholes in his system despite months of vigilance and occasionally intentionally collapsing the static by passing too much mass through it (a.k.a. rolling, a common practice among all those reporting). Another commonality between reports is that the time between the appearance of these wormholes is typically on the order of one to two weeks.

Exit Wormholes and Proto-Wormholes

The exit point of a wormhole is always a wormhole of type K162, meaning K162 wormholes can be found just about everywhere (except Jove space, which seems to block them somehow). Exit points for each type of wormhole seem to form within a random system in a given class of w-space (1-6), high sec, low sec, or null sec, depending on the type of wormhole generating the exit. There seems to be a curious uncertainty principle at work in regard to K162 wormholes: a K162 will not form as an exit point until the originating wormhole has been "observed" or "pushed" into existence. Before they are "pushed" into existence, originating wormholes seem to exist as proto-wormholes which can remain stable for days, possibly indefinitely, if left alone (post 73). These proto-wormholes still seem to respond to scan signals like standard (previously visited) wormholes and can be probed down without "pushing" them into existence. Immediate proximity to a nearby spacial distortion or gravity source (such as a ship's warp corridor) seems to be the key to "pushing" wormholes into existence and even the endpoint of a cancelled warp corridor can be enough to cause a wormhole to come into existence and form a K162. This odd behavior of wormholes has always been difficult to demonstrate since the act of observing a wormhole destabilizes the proto-wormhole and brings it into a full fledged "wormhole" state. Previous to Project Snapshot, the only evidence that this was the case was the anecdotes of capsuleer residents of wormhole space, who noticed that if their local static wormholes were left unvisited, no one would be observed entering the system through the spot where the proto-wormhole had been probed. Data analysis from Project Snapshot has since been used to statistically verify this phenomena.

Base Signal Strength

Base Signal Strength is the strength with which a wormhole responds to scanning probes. The strength of a signal can be in one of several "bands" from 1/5 (20%) to 1/80 (1.25%). This applies not just to wormholes, but to all cosmic signatures: pirate hideaways, asteroid belts, hacking sites, and archaeological sites. By knowing the base signal strength of all cosmic signatures, an advanced scanning method can be employed to more quickly narrow the scope of a scan.

Wormhole Types

A full listing of wormhole types follows, in chart format. These charts pull together all the data gathered for Project Atlas and together with the list of all w-space systems represent the primary tool Atlas has to offer for navigation through w-space. In order to reach a certain destination, one merely need follow a path through the charts which would lead them to a system most likely to produce a wormhole leading to their desired destination. Where possible, total numbers or estimates for these numbers are provided in order to give a sense of the statistical likelihood of reaching a given class via a particular "scope" of system.

Charts

Wormholes to Class 1 (348) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime Mass/Jump Max mass Sig Str
Z647 static Class 2 8 all 128 16 hrs 20 Gg 500 Gg 10.0%
P060 static Class 4 18 all 46 16 hrs 20 Gg 500 Gg 5.0%
Y790 static Class 5 24 233 & 239 20 16 hrs 20 Gg 500 Gg 2.5%
Q317 static Class 6 30 301 6 16 hrs 20 Gg 500 Gg 2.5%
H121 wandering Class 1 ? ? ? 16 hrs 20 Gg 500 Gg 10.0%
V301 wandering Class 3 ? ? ? 16 hrs 20 Gg 500 Gg 5.0%
Z971 wandering high, low, & null ? ? ~67 high, ? low, ? null 16 hrs 20 Gg 100 Gg 10.0% high, 5.0% low, 2.5% null
Wormholes to Class 2 (525) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime mass/Jump max mass Sig Str
D382 static Class 2 6 all 141 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 6.67%
N766 static Class 4 16 all 60 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 4.0%
D364 static Class 5 24 234, 235, 237, & 238 31 16 hrs 300 Gg 1000 Gg 1.25%
G024 static Class 6 30 297 7 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 1.25%
C125 wandering Class 1 ? ? ? 16 hrs 20 Gg 1000 Gg 6.67%
I182 wandering Class 3 ? ? ? 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 4.0%
R943 wandering high, low, & null ? ? ~95 high, ? low, ? null 16 hrs 300 Gg 750 Gg 6.67% high,
4.0% low,
2.22% null
Wormholes to Class 3 (494) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime mass/Jump max mass Sig Str
O477 static Class 2 4 all 104 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 5.0%
C247 static Class 4 21 & 23 all 143 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 10.0%
M267 static Class 5 27 all 71 16 hrs 300 Gg 1000 Gg 1.25%
L477 static Class 6 30 300 & 304 17 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 5.0%
O883 wandering Class 1 ? ? ? 16 hrs 20 Gg 1000 Gg 5.0%
N968 wandering Class 3 ? ? ? 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 10.0%
X702 wandering high, low, & null ? ? ~81 high, ? low, ? null 24 hrs 300 Gg 1000 Gg 5.0% high,
10.0% low,
5.0% null
Wormholes to Class 4 (505) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime mass/Jump max mass Sig Str
Y683 static Class 2 5 all 102 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 4.0%
X877 static Class 4 19 & 20 all 144 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 6.67%
E175 static Class 5 29 all 90 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 5.0%
Z457 static Class 6 30 302 & 305 17 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 4.0%
M609 wandering Class 1 ? ? ? 16 hrs 20 Gg 1000 Gg 4.0%
T405 wandering Class 3 ? ? ? 16 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 6.67%
O128 wandering high, low, & null ? ? <5 high, ? low, ? null 24 hrs 300 Gg 1000 Gg ?
Wormholes to Class 5 (512 systems) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime mass/Jump max mass Sig Str
N062 static Class 2 7 55-58 40 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg 2.5%
H900 static Class 4 22 all 87 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg 2.5%
H296 static Class 5 24, 25, & 28 all except 233-235 & 237-239 232 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 10.0%
V911 static Class 6 30 299 & 306-310 52 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 10.0%
L614 wandering Class 1 ? ? ? 24 hrs 20 Gg 1000 Gg 2.5%
N770 wandering Class 3 ? ? ? 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg 2.5%
M555 wandering high sec ? ? ~36 24 hrs 1000 Gg 3000 Gg 2.5%
N432 wandering low & null sec ? ? ? 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 2.5% low,
10.0% null
Wormholes to Class 6 (113) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime mass/Jump max mass Sig Str
R474 static Class 2 7 59 10 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg 2.22%
U574 static Class 4 17 all 25 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg 1.25%
V753 static Class 5 26 all 68 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 6.67%
W237 static Class 6 30 298 & 303 14 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 6.67%
S804 wandering Class 1 ? ? ? 24 hrs 20 Gg 1000 Gg 1.25%
A982 wandering Class 3 ? ? ? 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg 2.22%
B041 wandering high sec ? ? <5 48 hrs 300 Gg 5000 Gg ?
U319 wandering ?** ? ? ? 48 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg ?
note: B041 & U319 are theorized to appear in "high sec" and "low and null sec" respectively
Wormholes to High Security (1212) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime mass/Jump max mass Sig Str
N110 static Class 1 2 & 3 all 215 24 hrs 20 Gg 1000 Gg 10.0%
B274 static Class 2 4, 5, & 8 all 334 24 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 10.0%
D845 static Class 3 12 all 105 24 hrs 300 Gg 5000 Gg 5.0%
D792 wandering Class 5 & 6 ? ? >6 24 hrs 1000 Gg 3000 Gg 2.5% c5, 2.5% c6
A641 wandering high sec ? ? ~51 16 hrs 1000 Gg 2000 Gg 10.0%
B449 wandering null sec ? ? ? 16 hrs 1000 Gg 2000 Gg 2.5%
S047 wandering ? ? ? ? 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg ?
B520 wandering ? ? ? ? 24 hrs 300 Gg 5000 Gg ?
Wormholes to Low Security (695) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime mass/Jump max mass Sig Str
J244 static Class 1 1 314-323 105 24 hrs 20 Gg 1000 Gg 5.0%
A239 static Class 2 6 all 141 24 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 5.0%
U210 static Class 3 9,10,11,13, & 15 all 294 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg 10.0%
C140 wandering Class 5 & 6 ? ? ? 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 5.0% c5, 5.0% c6
R051 wandering high sec ? ? ~18 16 hrs 1000 Gg 3000 Gg 5.0%
N944 wandering low & null sec ? ? ? 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 10.0% low,
5.0% null
N290 wandering ?** ? ? ? 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg ?
C391 wandering ?** ? ? ? 24 hrs 1800 Gg 5000 Gg ?
Wormholes to Null Security (3294*^) Systems Extra Stats
Name Type Departs from Region Constellations Total Count Lifetime mass/Jump max mass Sig Str
Z060 static Class 1 1 311-323 28 24 hrs 20 Gg 1000 Gg 2.5%
E545 static Class 2 7 all 50 24 hrs 300 Gg 2000 Gg 2.5%
K346 static Class 3 14 all 96 24 hrs 300 Gg 3000 Gg 2.5%
Z142 wandering Class 5 & 6 ? ? ? 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 10% c5, 10% c6
V283 wandering high sec ? ? ~8 24 hrs 1000 Gg 3000 Gg 2.5%
S199 wandering null sec ? ? ? 24 hrs 1350 Gg 3000 Gg 10%
C248 wandering ?** ? ? ? 24 hrs 1800 Gg 5000 Gg ?
K329 wandering ?** ? ? ? 24 hrs 1800 Gg 5000 Gg ?
note: mass/jump = total mass in gigagrams (Gg) that can pass through wormhole at once (limits ship size able to enter various sectors of space; it's possible that CONCORD's anti cap ship technology may be having an effect on wormholes, further study needed), max mass = maximum amount of mass that can pass through before wormhole collapse, and sig str = base signature strength (used for scanning)
note also: class 1 allows only 20,000,000 kg per passage, restricting ships to battlecruiser or smaller; it is possible that something similar to CONCORD anti cap ship tech is influencing wormholes in class 1 space, further study needed.
note also: wormholes marked with a ? or a ** in their "Departs from" field have not been sighted and require confirmation.
further note: constellation statics not included in "Total Counts" field due to lack of data on these wormholes.
* null sec not including jove/ccp space
^also note that the odds of finding a wormhole in null sec can be influenced by the Quantum Flux Generator infrastructure upgrade.
** these wormholes do not bridge from or to high sec, class 1, 2, 3, or 4 space, judging by mass allowances (high sec, class 1, 2, 3, and 4 do not allow more than 1,000,000,000 kg per passage, i.e. no dreadnaught or higher).
sources: Arek'Jaalan Project Compass, Arek'Jaalan Project Snapshot, Arek'Jaalan Project Atlas (which include previous groundwork laid by Elisa Fir).

Locus Signatures

"Locus Signatures" are the names of each w-space system (e.g. J100003, J172751, J204635, J235447, ect..). It has long been theorized (203rd post) that these locus signatures are directions to nearby quasars. Under this theory each signature JHHMMSS indicates the J2000 equinox of reference in the equatorial plane of the ancient Terran home world, where HHMMSS is the Right Ascension in hours, minutes, and seconds. Normally a declination is also given, however only 3 systems give something resembling even a partial declination (possibly because their "seconds" column would otherwise contain omitted zeros, which allowed a portion of the remainder of the name +/-DDMMSS to show up in the NeoCom, which for some reason shows clipped system names to 7 characters). Here +/-DDMMSS would be the declination in degrees, minutes, and seconds. Together, the Right Ascension and Declination form a set of coordinates in the ancient Terran sky which indicate the position of a quasar. The following image shows a visualization of this interpretation:
Image generated for Project Compass

In lieu of a declination, all lines are in the plane of the New Eden and Anoikis star clusters. And in lieu of any real reference point, CONCORD's +x axis was used. Red shift in a quasar is also an important element in identifying distance to a quasar, though normally that information is not in the quasar's name. The 3 systems mentioned before which seem to show partial declinations are: J1259+0 (C5), J1340+6 (C5), and J1226-0 (C4). The Project Compass data even contains one of these systems: J1340+6 (C5); its name shows up in the NeoCom as: J134096. I assume that the reason for this is that in the NeoCom database a '9' where only a 0-5 should be is interpreted by the code as a '+'. I'd also like to note that this missing declination and red shift information is needed to complete Project Atlas's secondary goal of decoding the Locus Signatures. (( I'd really like to know how Capsuleers have come to know the Locus Signatures. Is this how the local sleeper comm system is identifying itself or did the empires give the systems these names? If CCP Abraxas and team Mercury could shed some light on why we're using this funky naming scheme and why it's incomplete, that'd be great. ))

Recommendations for Further Study

  • Reproduce observations that Proto-Wormholes can exist for days if undisturbed.
  • Reproduce experiment that showed constellation static wormhole moving from system to system in a given constellation.
  • Catalogue and document all constellation static wormholes.
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